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Piantist Joe DeFazio performs on a piano in a flatbed to raise awareness for Piano Day Pittsburgh (Rebecca Droke/Post-Gazette).

Progressive for Pittsburgh? This past Sunday was the third annual Pittsburgh Piano Day, a free event that places pianos throughout the city for professionals, amateurs and even the public to play. Event organizers estimate that about 2,000 Pittsburghers attended the events in Heinz Hall, Market Square, Katz Plaza and PPG Plaza, with thousands more stopping by during their Downtown visit. One attendee remarked,  “This is a really progressive musical event for Pittsburgh. It’s more like something San Francisco would do.”

Ghanaian fusion: Pianist and educator Joe Sheehan has released an album, "Songs of Lake Volta," in partnership with the Kinetic ensemble, the Kassia Ensemble and vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield. The launch concert took place at Mr. Smalls Funhouse last Wednesday, with the musicians delivering an enthralling performance of tracks from the new album, a mix of Ghanaian folk music blended with classical and jazz styles. Definitely worth a listen.

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Actor Wali Jamal as August Wilson in "How I Learned What I Learned."

Did you know: Pittsburgh actor Wali Jamal is about to make history. He has performed in all 10 plays in August Wilson's American Century Cycle and this weekend will become the lone actor to add No. 11: the playwright's solo autobiographical show, "How I Learned What I Learned." Previous actors known to have performed it are Mr. Wilson, Ruben Santiago Hudson, Victor Mack, Eugene Lee (at Pittsburgh Public Theater) and Mr. Jamal, who delivered "How I Learned . . ." at the August Wilson Center during the August Wilson Society conference in April. Mr. Jamal takes the stage at 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday and 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday at the New Hazlett Theater, North Side. Must be 18 and older; tickets: $13.

King of comedy: Neil Simon, who died this past weekend at age 91, is celebrated mostly for his plays, but he also wrote the books of musicals including "They're Playing Our Song," inspired by chats with the late composer and PSO Pops conductor Marvin Hamlisch. In his memoir, Hamlisch wrote, "It never dawned on me that my stories about Carole Bayer Sager and me had started the Simon creative juices flowing. I was puzzled when one day, a few months later, Carole and I received a brown envelope from Neil." Inside was the libretto for "They're Playing Our Song."

Change in schedule: The Trust Cabaret appearance by Eva Noblezada has been moved up due to a scheduling conflict. The Tony-nominated star of "Miss Saigon" will premiere "Girl No More" at the Greer Cabaret, Downtown, on Monday, Oct. 1; trustarts.org or 412-456-6666.

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Point Park University dance department chair Garfield Lemonius, center, leads students in class exercises. (Steph Chambers/Post-Gazette)

Bravo to Point Park: The university's dance program landed on OnStage Blog's yearly list of top 25 college dance programs in the country. It ranked No. 5 -- only one spot behind New York City's prestigious Juilliard School. The arts site lauded Point Park as "hands down the best college in the country that offers both a BA and BFA in dance." You can catch these talented students in action when the conservatory's main stage season resumes in October.

Behind the scenes: The Post-Gazette got a sneak peek at the choreography that's being created for Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre's new production of "The Great Gatsby." Choreographer Jorden Morris (former principal with Canada's Royal Winnipeg Ballet) and London-based composer Carl Davis have been in town working with dancers for this premiere. Expect expressive movements, drama and, of course, exquisite dancing. Only thing, though: You'll have to wait until January 2019 to see it on stage at Benedum Center.